Now on NetGalley: The Goblins of Bellwater

9781771681179For all you reviewers who love stories of the fae-type, we’ve got a great novel coming from the most wonderful, Molly Ringle. The Goblins of Bellwater is a New Adult paranormal inspired by Christina Rossetti’s eerie, sensual poem, “Goblin Market”. It’s the kind of poem that gives you that creepy, crawly feeling up your arms. Here’s an excerpt, but you can read the full, beautiful poem here.


“Hug me, kiss me, suck my juices

Squeez’d from goblin fruits for you,
Goblin pulp and goblin dew.

Eat me, drink me, love me;”


The book is up on NetGalley right now, and after only a day, we’ve received almost 200 requests and the cover has dozens of thumbs-ups. If you like the look of the book, head over to NetGalley to pick up a copy – or just give it some cover-love.
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Persephone’s Orchard: Book of the Month?

PersOrchSo for the third time, one of our books is up for Book of the Month over at Long and Short Reviews. Would you consider voting for Persephone’s Orchard by Molly Ringle? It’s very fast and you don’t have to leave any personal information.

Click Here to Vote

BoM-August-2013-ENGLAND

If we get this, Central Avenue Publishing will have both the August Book of the Month and September too. Last month, Darlene Foster’s Amanda in England won.

Thank you so much!

Prayer to Persephone

The Rape of Proserpina by Bernini
Close up of The Rape of Proserpina by Bernini

Every once in a while I find a passage that deeply affects me. In working on our new book, Persephone’s Orchard by Molly Ringle, I happened upon this dark poem by Edna St. Vincent Millay.

Be to her, Persephone,
All the things I might not be;
Take her head upon your knee.
She that was so proud and wild,
Flippant, arrogant and free,
She that had no need of me,
Is a little lonely child
Lost in Hell,—Persephone,
Take her head upon your knee;
Say to her, “My dear, my dear,
It is not so dreadful here.

I was recently asked if poetry written by women was regarded as being whiny or irritating. Anyone reading this poem would agree that it is neither and the depth and beauty rivals any poem written – by woman or man.

Cover Reveal: Persephone’s Orchard by Molly Ringle

Persephone's OrchardWe have a few projects in the pipeline, and one of them is Persephone’s Orchard by Molly Ringle. It’s a new telling of an old myth and we’re happy to release the cover here. Check it out when it releases in June 2013.

The Greek gods never actually existed. Did they? Sophie Darrow finds she was wrong about that assumption when she’s pulled into the spirit realm, complete with an Underworld, on her very first day at college. Adrian, the mysterious young man who brought her there, simply wants her to taste a pomegranate. And soon, though she returns to her regular life, her mind begins exploding with dreams and memories of ancient times–of a love between two Greeks named Persephone and Hades. But lethal danger has always surrounded the immortals, and now that she’s tainted with the Underworld’s magic, that danger is drawing closer to Sophie.

ISBN Trade Paperback: 978-1-926760-98-8
ISBN ebook: 978-1-926760-99-5
FICTION | Mythology
Pages: 300
List Price: $15.95 | $4.99
Coming: June 21, 2013

On Being a Small Press Author – Molly Ringle

Running a small press is just like running a business with a group of employees – well almost. I don’t actually get to see them every day and we can’t gather around the water cooler to chat. Since we all see each other only virtually, I thought it might be nice to ‘introduce’ our authors to both each other and their readers via a series of short interviews. These interviews will run every couple of days for the next month or so – it’s a neat way of finding out how similar authors can be, and yet so different.

_________________________

Today, I’m proud to present Molly Ringle, a Seattle author who has written several young adult books across a variety of genres. We have published Relatively Honest and What Scotland Taught Me, two fun books that capture the essence of what it’s like when you’re starting out on your own. What I love about Molly is her great sense of humor, and her affinity for pop culture and fragrances. She’s been a huge supporter of ours and I’m an even bigger fan of hers.

1. The first book I can remember reading is:  Since I can’t remember learning to read (it happened pretty early), I am not sure what the first book was, though I feel like it was perhaps a Richard Scarry book. I do remember my grandmother having me read aloud a paragraph from the encyclopedia to her friends, to show off how well I could read. I was maybe five at the time.

2. The first book I ever wrote was:  ‘This Is a Difficult World.’ It was a novella. And the title sucks, yes. But it accurately conveys the IT’S NOT FAIR feelings of my middle-school self at the time. It was about some lame arguments my sister and I had with our best neighborhood friends.

3. An average day in my life goes like this:
“Mom, I want cheese puffs.”
“That’s not breakfast. Hang on, I’m getting you cereal and fruit.”
“NOOOOO. CHEESE PUFFS.”
“Maybe after you eat your real breakfast.”
“MOM! HE HIT ME!”
“Guys, quiet, I’m trying to check email real fast.”
“MOM! WHERE IS THE GREEN CABOOSE?”
“I don’t know, guys, it isn’t my job to keep track of your toys. Please go play; Mommy’s working.”
“Toilet. Heheh. Poopy butt. Heheh.”
“Don’t be rude. Nice words please.”
“Mom, are you still working? Mom, when are we going to the park?”
“FIVE MINUTES. LEAVE ME ALONE.”
(*ignoring children wailing while I type an email about how fun my life as a writer is, and how pleasant people are to me*)
But eventually…
“Hi Mommy. I love you so much.”
“Thanks, buddy. I love you too.”

4. I found out about Central Avenue Publishing from: The Preditors and Editors poll, where it got high ranking from its writers and readers.  I decided to submit my book because:  Michelle wrote a great post on the company blog about how much she’d learned already and how great business was going. She sounded so professional and encouraging, I figured it would be a safe bet to try one of my books with her. Best publishing instinct I’ve had so far.

5. The last book I read was: This has been a busy summer with not nearly enough reading–I’m still in the middle of some very good books, including one from Central Ave (William Topek’s latest). But the best books I lately finished were Les Misérables (Victor Hugo) for fiction, and The Perfect Scent: a Year Inside the Perfume Industry in Paris and New York (Chandler Burr) for nonfiction.

6. In order for me to sit down and write, I need:  A pretty good chance of not being interrupted. See my typical day, above, however.

7. My ‘day job’ is: Stay-at-home mom, currently.

8. I carve out time to write by:  Begging, borrowing, purchasing, and stealing it.

9. In order to find time to write, I feel as though I sacrifice:  Any sense of how to decorate a home or be a good hostess. Really, I can’t even remember to offer to take people’s coats when they visit. And that talent of making a room look pretty–yeah, I have no idea how people do that. But I’m trying to improve on both fronts.

10. I am currently working on: A fun and lengthy YA novel that plays with Greek mythology and reincarnation and other outlandish stuff.

11. The best piece of advice I ever got was: For writing: Put your masterpiece away when it’s done, and don’t look at it for a month or so. When you come back to it, you’ll see a zillion new flaws. Then have someone else look at it too, because they’ll see a zillion more. Pretty much everyone says that, but one such person was Stephen King in ‘On Writing.’
For life in general: lately I like: “If we all threw our problems in a pile and saw everyone else’s, we’d grab ours back.” The web claims that’s from Regina Brett.

12. The best piece of advice I would give is: For writing: Listen when people give you feedback on your story, even when the criticism makes you flinch. Thinking about their suggestions will almost certainly make you come up with a dozen new ways to improve your story that you would never have thought of before–maybe including their idea, maybe not, but you’ll love the improvements in the end.
For life in general: Figure out what makes you laugh immoderately, and seek out that trigger every day.